I like pie....Follow @patemichrina

edwad:

*phone rings*
“hello”
“hi! is your refrigerator running”
“yes it is”
“mine is as well! can’t wait to see your fridge at the race tomorrow”

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catazoid:

Lyalya is 99% tail and 1% cat

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"   If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them.   "

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via mysweetetc)
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this-is-an-open-letter:

Jimmy Fallon paying tribute to Robin Williams

We, like all of you were shaken up a bit last night when we learned that genius comedian and actor Robin Williams passed away. He was one in a kind. He was one in a million. He was unbelievable. If you don’t know his stand-up then you should YouTube it right now and watch it. He was amazing. He was funny and he was fast. He would weave in and out of characters and get Shakespearean. It was incredible.”

Jimmy then proceeded to do his best Robin impersonation, and concluded his tribute by standing on his desk and playing out a key scene in Dead Poets Society.

“Oh captain, my captain, you will be missed.”

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The moment when Harry takes Draco's wand
J. K. Rowling: I said to Arthur, my American editor - we had an interesting conversation during the editing of seven - the moment when Harry takes Draco's wand, Arthur said, God, that's the moment when the ownership of the Elder wand is actually transferred? And I said, that's right. He said, shouldn't that be a bit more dramatic? And I said, no, not at all, the reverse. I said to Arthur, I think it really puts the elaborate, grandiose plans of Dumbledore and Voldemort in their place. That actually the history of the wizarding world hinged on two teenage boys wrestling with each other. They weren't even using magic. It became an ugly little corner tussle for the possession of wands. And I really liked that - that very human moment, as opposed to these two wizards who were twitching strings and manipulating and implanting information and husbanding information and guarding information, you know? Ultimately it just came down to that, a little scuffle and fistfight in the corner and pulling a wand away.
Melissa Anelli: It says a lot about the world at large, I think, about conflict in the world, it's these little things -
J. K. Rowing: And the difference one individual can make. Always, the difference one individual can make.
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Q: What was Hogwarts graduation like? Do we have any info on that? I've always wondered!

simplypotterheads:

There is! 

John Noe: Now, you know what I’m curious about now, is that one of the neatest things about the Hogwarts tradition is the entrance ceremony, from the whole riding the boats to the castle to the sorting ceremony. What kind of traditions is there for graduation, and leaving Hogwarts?
J.K. Rowling: Do you know, John, I’m really glad you asked that, because I felt a huge sadness that I wouldn’t write a graduation scene. I really, during the final book, kept thinking it would’ve been — it felt sad that the book wasn’t going to end with that feast scene, the graduation scene, but it couldn’t, it just couldn’t. That’s not the way it could’ve ended. It would’ve felt far too trite, and a lot of people felt the epilogue was too sentimental. I think to have a graduation scene on top of what just happened would’ve been absurd anticlimax.
John Noe: Did you have ideas for kind of traditions they would do, like ride the boats back out of Hogwarts —
J.K. Rowling: Oh yeah, definitely! The boats would’ve been the most poetic and beautiful way to for them to leave, and symbolic in that they — Harry wouldn’t have seen the Thestrals again. You know what I mean? It would’ve been a return to innocence really, and passage of water is so symbolic, in history of magic. So yeah, I think it would’ve been great.
— PotterCast Interviews J.K. Rowling, part one. PotterCast #130, 17 December 2007

-Ashley


asked by Anonymous
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joshpeck:

flavoredfeline:

joshpeck:

hey

okay how does one word get 90 notes??

get this post 1 million notes

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leviathans-in-the-tardis:

crime-andpunishment:

starkky:

are oranges named oranges because oranges are orange or is orange called orange because oranges are orange

The colour was named after the fruit. Before that, people would just use the colour red to describe something that we consider orange now. It’s why we call gingers red-heads and why robins are red breasted, when really they’re an orange colour.

image

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